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Chasing warmer days

Alaska to Durham, North Carolina

sunny 27 °C

There is nothing like going back to the place where you grew up. This week Rodrigo and I have been staying busy in Durham North Carolina. This is where Rodrigo grew up and left for the Army. Graciously, the Army pays for him and his things to get back to North Carolina after completing his contract. His last day was September 24th. We flew out of orange and yellow autumn kissed Anchorage on October 1st.

Day one and day two of our adventures included getting Rodrigo's Honda CRX back to life ( we will be driving her to Columbus, GA next week). She had been sitting still waiting fo his return for two years. We had fueled her up, recharged the battery but she just wouldn't turn on. After a call to my dad we concluded it was the distributor. We spent the next night learning all about distributors from my dad and Eric The Car Guy off of you tube. We learned how to test each part to locate the problem. The next day, Rodrigo was able to replace the coil, rotor and distributor cap with a spare he had saved from another Honda Model. Turns out most of the parts are the same for both models (but autozone doesn't want you to know that). There is something great that happens when resources are scarce. I call it, innovation or resourceful thought. In this case, we didn't have extra money ($200 to be exact) to spend on a new distributor so we took the old one apart and built a new one with what we had. All we bought was a $12 test light. I love this resourceful quality about Rodrigo. It is one that I learnt from my parents who didn't always have much but made the most of what they had. Finally! The sound of the engine firing up was pure music to our ears.

On to more of a vacation, we set out on Saturday with Marianela (Rodrigo's mum) and Mark (Rodrigo's soon to be step father) to visit the North Carolina Coast. We stayed on the shores of Kure Beach. There is a iong pier where locals crowd to fish for their daily catch and a sandy beach lined with houses. The houses along this shore are picturesque. They stand dramatically straight upon their stilts with impressive balconies and perfect pottery barn chairs, accent tables and cushions. The town screams holiday get away with the family and is a peculiar town with what I can only describe as "an interesting" amount of fried food. Appa]]rently, this is the case in most places this far south, if its tangible they can fry it.

We stopped at the Fort Fischer Aquarium to see the local wildlife all in one place. This aquarium has prioritized a message of conservation throughout their tour which I appreciate greatly. I fell in love with a turtle who looked up at me and touched a horse shoe crab. Rodrigo was most intrigued by the sharks and eels in the biggest tank. Later that day I enjoyed playing in the waves with Rodrigo and flying our kite on the beach. There is something about sea breeze, the sound of waves and salty air that brings me sincere happiness.

On our way back to Durham we took the ferry to Oak Island. We stopped at Fishy FIshy Cafe for lunch. This meal finally did not include fried anything and did include some produce. The service was great, my caesar salad was delicious and we sat in the sun admiring the yachts and local birds flying about. We spent the rest of the afternoon lazily admiring the perfection of historic houses and the weird house dedicated to selling Christmas decorations (and more) all year around (some people can never have enough stuff). I think I remember Mark saying he might have a seizure upon entering this house which was wall to wall, and floor to ceiling full of things no one really needs.

The weekend ended back in Durham with a nice dinner and time to read a book. Rodrigo and I are reading Modoc the story of the greatest elephant that ever lived (Spanish Edition).

Posted by RnE Adventures 19:22 Archived in USA Tagged beaches cars sun aquariums fried_food beach_houses

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